DRAW Blog

Exploring weather and all it entails

Tags



#announcement

Don't Miss Our New Educators Corner, Years in the Making...

Drew Bush, May 5th 2020

You may have noticed a new tab on our website meant just for teachers and educators who want to bring Canada’s history and citizen science into their classrooms. Read more>>

tags: #announcement #education #educators corner

Superb Super-Users: Thank You!

DRAW Team, April 29th 2020

We want to say a super thank-you today to our super-users. Our users’ time and effort is our most precious resource and without your help, this data would remain locked inaccessibly in paper format. Read more>>

tags: #announcement

Calling All Weather Enthusiasts - We Challenge You!

DRAW Team, April 8th 2020

Looking for something to do while you’re self-isolating and social-distancing? Would you like to contribute to weather, climate science, and history? Come help us transcribe weather records from the past on DRAW. Read more>>

tags: #announcement


#book review

BOOK REVIEW: Climate in the Age of Empire

Rachel Black, October 23rd 2019

A post looking at the book Climate in the Age of Empire: Weather Observers in Colonial Canada, written by Dr. Victoria Slonosky. Learn more about the history of weather observations in Canada between the mid 18th and early 20th century. Read more>>

tags: #book review #climate in the age of empire


#citizen science

Interview with Renee Sieber: What is Citizen Science

Rachel Black, November 25th 2020

Welcome to this week’s edition of the DRAW Blog where DRAW had the pleasure of interviewing Dr. Renee Sieber to discuss 4 questions about Citizen Science. Read more>>

tags: #interview #citizen science


#citizen science month

Meet the Meteorologists: France

Victoria Slonosky, April 14th 2021

Welcome back to Meet the Meteorologists, where we look at the individuals around the world who helped to contribute to the creation of meteorology as a field of study and who helped inform the practice here in Montreal. This week as part of Citizen Science Month, let’s take a look at those influential individuals from France. Read more>>

tags: #meet the meteorologists #citizen science month #climate in the age of empire


#climate in the age of empire

Meet the Meteorologists: France

Victoria Slonosky, April 14th 2021

Welcome back to Meet the Meteorologists, where we look at the individuals around the world who helped to contribute to the creation of meteorology as a field of study and who helped inform the practice here in Montreal. This week as part of Citizen Science Month, let’s take a look at those influential individuals from France. Read more>>

tags: #meet the meteorologists #citizen science month #climate in the age of empire

Irish Meteorologists

Victoria Slonosky, March 17th 2021

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!
For today’s commemoration of the holiday, we thought we would look at two notable Irish Meteorologists who helped inform the practice in Montreal. Read more>>

tags: #climate in the age of empire

Meet the Meteorologists: Toronto

Victoria Slonosky, January 6th 2021

Welcome back to this instalment of Meet the Meteorologists where we look at the individuals around the world who helped to contribute to the creation of meteorology as a field of study and who helped inform the practice here in Montreal. This week let’s dive into the individuals from the Toronto observatories (Royal Artillery and Civilian). Read more>>

tags: #meet the meteorologists #climate in the age of empire

Meet the Meteorologists: Hudson's Bay Company

Victoria Slonosky, November 11th 2020

Welcome back to the next edition of Meet the Meteorologists, where we will be taking a look at those influential individuals from the Hudson’s Bay Company, which is the oldest incorporated joint-stock merchandising company in the English-speaking world. Read more>>

tags: #meet the meteorologists #climate in the age of empire

Meet the Meteorologists: Montreal

Victoria Slonosky, September 30th 2020

Welcome back to Meet the Meteorologists, where we look at the individuals around the world who helped to contribute to the creation of meteorology as a field of study and who helped inform the practice here in Montreal. This week, let’s look at those Montreal individuals! Read more>>

tags: #meet the meteorologists #climate in the age of empire

Meet the Meteorologists: Quebec City

Victoria Slonosky, August 5th 2020

Today we are kicking off a new series on the blog: Meet the Meteorologists. Our aim is to look at the individuals around the world who helped to contribute to the creation of meteorology as a field of study and who helped inform the practice here in Montreal. Let’s kick things off with New France and the people who called Quebec City home. Read more>>

tags: #meet the meteorologists #climate in the age of empire

BOOK REVIEW: Climate in the Age of Empire

Rachel Black, October 23rd 2019

A post looking at the book Climate in the Age of Empire: Weather Observers in Colonial Canada, written by Dr. Victoria Slonosky. Learn more about the history of weather observations in Canada between the mid 18th and early 20th century. Read more>>

tags: #book review #climate in the age of empire


#education

Don't Miss Our New Educators Corner, Years in the Making...

Drew Bush, May 5th 2020

You may have noticed a new tab on our website meant just for teachers and educators who want to bring Canada’s history and citizen science into their classrooms. Read more>>

tags: #announcement #education #educators corner

DRAW and Student Projects: ENVR 401

Rachel Black, January 8th 2020

Since 2015, a student team from the ENVR 401: Environmental Research course has been formulating research projects around citizen science, weather and more specifically the DRAW Project. Read more>>

tags: #education

DRAWn into Education

Rachel Black, October 9th 2019

Bad puns aside, we’ve focused so far on historical weather, our ledgers and our members, as well as the transcription process on the blog so today we will explore other aspects of the DRAW project – namely fostering education and awareness. Read more>>

tags: #education

Guest Post: Air Quality in Montreal

Geoffrey Pearce, June 19th 2019

Guest Author Geoffrey Pearce discusses air quality in Montreal, and the challenge he posed to his students in an Environmental Studies course at Dawson College. Read more>>

tags: #guest post #education


#educators corner

Don't Miss Our New Educators Corner, Years in the Making...

Drew Bush, May 5th 2020

You may have noticed a new tab on our website meant just for teachers and educators who want to bring Canada’s history and citizen science into their classrooms. Read more>>

tags: #announcement #education #educators corner


#film review

Film Review: Twister (1996)

Jazmine Aldrich, June 9th 2021

In today’s edition of the DRAW Blog, we’ll be taking a trip back in time to just over twenty-five years ago, when the blockbuster movie Twister hit theatres in May of 1996. What can we Weather Enthusiasts learn from this action-packed megabit? Read more>>

tags: #film review


#GLIS 641 Convocation

Convocations, traditions, and our medical professionals

Gavin Goodwin and Kate Moore, June 2nd 2021

For our final week celebrating McGill’s bicentennial and our upcoming 2021 graduates, let’s travel back to March 26th 1887! Read more>>

tags: #history #guest post #GLIS 641 Convocation

A Mysterious Disappearance

Christopher Blouin and Sam Heinrichs, May 26th 2021

In celebration of both McGill’s bicentennial and our upcoming 2021 graduates, we are happy to introduce a series of posts develop by students from the McGill School of Information Studies (SIS) course, GLIS 641: Archival Description and Access, which will examine 5 convocation dates from the past.

Let’s travel to Spring 1887 and explore a case of disappearance that coincided with graduation that year. Read more>>

tags: #history #guest post #GLIS 641 Convocation

Convocation: April 30th 1891

Allie Thiel, Eliza Guinn, and Brittany Nolan, May 19th 2021

In celebration of both McGill’s bicentennial and our upcoming 2021 graduates, we are happy to introduce a series of posts developed by students from the McGill School of Information Studies (SIS) course, GLIS 641: Archival Description and Access, which will examine 5 convocation dates from the past.

Today’s post transports us back to April 1891. Read more>>

tags: #history #guest post #GLIS 641 Convocation

On This Day: McGill University Spring Convocation, April 30th 1894

Arshdeep Gill and Kira Brown, May 12th 2021

In celebration of both McGill’s bicentennial and our upcoming 2021 graduates, we are happy to introduce a series of posts developed by students from the McGill School of Information Studies (SIS) course, GLIS 641: Archival Description and Access, which will examine 5 convocation dates from the past.

For the second week, let’s take a look at April 30th 1894, 127 years ago. Read more>>

tags: #history #guest post #GLIS 641 Convocation

A Day in the Life of a Donalda

Jazmine Aldrich, Katherine Kirkpatrick, and Catriona Mulholland, May 5th 2021

Convocation season is upon us! In the past, convocation at McGill could occur at any point between March and June, depending on the faculty in question. These days, convocation ceremonies at McGill usually occur over several days at the beginning of June on the lower downtown campus.

In celebration of both McGill’s bicentennial and our upcoming 2021 graduates, we are happy to introduce a series of posts developed by students from the McGill School of Information Studies (SIS) course, GLIS 641: Archival Description and Access, which will examine 5 convocation dates from the past.

This week, let’s kick things off with a look at April 30th 1902, through the eyes of a Donalda. Read more>>

tags: #history #guest post #GLIS 641 Convocation


#guest post

Convocations, traditions, and our medical professionals

Gavin Goodwin and Kate Moore, June 2nd 2021

For our final week celebrating McGill’s bicentennial and our upcoming 2021 graduates, let’s travel back to March 26th 1887! Read more>>

tags: #history #guest post #GLIS 641 Convocation

A Mysterious Disappearance

Christopher Blouin and Sam Heinrichs, May 26th 2021

In celebration of both McGill’s bicentennial and our upcoming 2021 graduates, we are happy to introduce a series of posts develop by students from the McGill School of Information Studies (SIS) course, GLIS 641: Archival Description and Access, which will examine 5 convocation dates from the past.

Let’s travel to Spring 1887 and explore a case of disappearance that coincided with graduation that year. Read more>>

tags: #history #guest post #GLIS 641 Convocation

Convocation: April 30th 1891

Allie Thiel, Eliza Guinn, and Brittany Nolan, May 19th 2021

In celebration of both McGill’s bicentennial and our upcoming 2021 graduates, we are happy to introduce a series of posts developed by students from the McGill School of Information Studies (SIS) course, GLIS 641: Archival Description and Access, which will examine 5 convocation dates from the past.

Today’s post transports us back to April 1891. Read more>>

tags: #history #guest post #GLIS 641 Convocation

On This Day: McGill University Spring Convocation, April 30th 1894

Arshdeep Gill and Kira Brown, May 12th 2021

In celebration of both McGill’s bicentennial and our upcoming 2021 graduates, we are happy to introduce a series of posts developed by students from the McGill School of Information Studies (SIS) course, GLIS 641: Archival Description and Access, which will examine 5 convocation dates from the past.

For the second week, let’s take a look at April 30th 1894, 127 years ago. Read more>>

tags: #history #guest post #GLIS 641 Convocation

A Day in the Life of a Donalda

Jazmine Aldrich, Katherine Kirkpatrick, and Catriona Mulholland, May 5th 2021

Convocation season is upon us! In the past, convocation at McGill could occur at any point between March and June, depending on the faculty in question. These days, convocation ceremonies at McGill usually occur over several days at the beginning of June on the lower downtown campus.

In celebration of both McGill’s bicentennial and our upcoming 2021 graduates, we are happy to introduce a series of posts developed by students from the McGill School of Information Studies (SIS) course, GLIS 641: Archival Description and Access, which will examine 5 convocation dates from the past.

This week, let’s kick things off with a look at April 30th 1902, through the eyes of a Donalda. Read more>>

tags: #history #guest post #GLIS 641 Convocation

Guest Post: Air Quality in Montreal

Geoffrey Pearce, June 19th 2019

Guest Author Geoffrey Pearce discusses air quality in Montreal, and the challenge he posed to his students in an Environmental Studies course at Dawson College. Read more>>

tags: #guest post #education


#history

Convocations, traditions, and our medical professionals

Gavin Goodwin and Kate Moore, June 2nd 2021

For our final week celebrating McGill’s bicentennial and our upcoming 2021 graduates, let’s travel back to March 26th 1887! Read more>>

tags: #history #guest post #GLIS 641 Convocation

A Mysterious Disappearance

Christopher Blouin and Sam Heinrichs, May 26th 2021

In celebration of both McGill’s bicentennial and our upcoming 2021 graduates, we are happy to introduce a series of posts develop by students from the McGill School of Information Studies (SIS) course, GLIS 641: Archival Description and Access, which will examine 5 convocation dates from the past.

Let’s travel to Spring 1887 and explore a case of disappearance that coincided with graduation that year. Read more>>

tags: #history #guest post #GLIS 641 Convocation

Convocation: April 30th 1891

Allie Thiel, Eliza Guinn, and Brittany Nolan, May 19th 2021

In celebration of both McGill’s bicentennial and our upcoming 2021 graduates, we are happy to introduce a series of posts developed by students from the McGill School of Information Studies (SIS) course, GLIS 641: Archival Description and Access, which will examine 5 convocation dates from the past.

Today’s post transports us back to April 1891. Read more>>

tags: #history #guest post #GLIS 641 Convocation

On This Day: McGill University Spring Convocation, April 30th 1894

Arshdeep Gill and Kira Brown, May 12th 2021

In celebration of both McGill’s bicentennial and our upcoming 2021 graduates, we are happy to introduce a series of posts developed by students from the McGill School of Information Studies (SIS) course, GLIS 641: Archival Description and Access, which will examine 5 convocation dates from the past.

For the second week, let’s take a look at April 30th 1894, 127 years ago. Read more>>

tags: #history #guest post #GLIS 641 Convocation

A Day in the Life of a Donalda

Jazmine Aldrich, Katherine Kirkpatrick, and Catriona Mulholland, May 5th 2021

Convocation season is upon us! In the past, convocation at McGill could occur at any point between March and June, depending on the faculty in question. These days, convocation ceremonies at McGill usually occur over several days at the beginning of June on the lower downtown campus.

In celebration of both McGill’s bicentennial and our upcoming 2021 graduates, we are happy to introduce a series of posts developed by students from the McGill School of Information Studies (SIS) course, GLIS 641: Archival Description and Access, which will examine 5 convocation dates from the past.

This week, let’s kick things off with a look at April 30th 1902, through the eyes of a Donalda. Read more>>

tags: #history #guest post #GLIS 641 Convocation

March: In Like a Lion, Out Like a Lamb

Jazmine Aldrich, March 31st 2021

Join us in reflecting on the weather proverb “In like a lion, out like a lamb” and how accurate (or inaccurate!) it might be. Read more>>

tags: #history

A Frosty Montreal Christmas

Jazmine Aldrich, December 23rd 2020

As we approach the Christmas holiday, we thought we would celebrate in the best way we know how... with some weather data! This blog post will explore the weather 140 years ago, on Christmas Day (December 25), 1880. Read more>>

tags: #history

Heatwaves: Blasts from the Past

Victoria Slonosky, July 8th 2020

Heatwaves and cold snaps have always been a feature of Montreal and Quebec Weather. Answering questions like ‘Which was the hottest day or warmest summer on record?’ is not always straightforward though when dealing with complicated historical data. Read more>>

tags: #history

A Day in the Archives

Brittany Nolan, April 15th 2020

This week let’s go behind the scenes and look at some of the archival research we have been doing here at DRAW, looking at the Dawson-Harrington fonds. Read more>>

tags: #history

The Flood of 1886

Brittany Nolan, March 18th 2020

In the 19th century, the coming of spring was often accompanied by floods in Montreal and the floods of 1886 were particularly bad. Read more>>

tags: #history

Weather Forecasting: Vennor’s Bulletin

Rachel Black, March 4th 2020

It’s likely not surprising to our readers that humans have been trying to forecast the weather, for a variety of reasons, for a long time. It’s not too different from what we do in fact, as ancient weather forecasting methods usually relied on observing events and see the patterns that came from them. Read more>>

tags: #history

On This Day: Winter Carnival 1883

Rachel Black, January 22nd 2020

Did you know this Friday, January 24th, is the 137th anniversary of the first winter carnival held in Montreal? In honour of this anniversary, let’s take a look at what the weather in Montreal was like that day. Read more>>

tags: #history #on this day

On This Day

Rachel Black, December 18th 2019

Let’s look at the weather 100 years ago today: December 18th 2019. What sort of similarities might there be to present day? Read more>>

tags: #history #on this day

Observing During the Wars

Victoria Slonosky, November 11th 2019

In commemoration of November 11th, Victoria Slonosky talks about the effect war has on meteorology, drawing on examples from our own ledgers. Read more>>

tags: #history

Weather in the History of Science

Victoria Slonosky, November 6th 2019

Learn more about the intersection between the history of science and weather observations/meteorology in this post by Dr. Victoria Slonosky. Read more>>

tags: #history #weather history

Sleighing

Victoria Slonosky, August 28th 2019

It’s hot and humid outside, and has been another sizzling summer. But before we complain too much, we should remember the past winter... Read more>>

tags: #history

Who Were the Observers

Victoria Slonosky, May 22 2019

Ever wondered who the individuals taking the observations at the McGill Observatory were? Check out this post to learn more. Read more>>

tags: #history


#humor

DRAW February Funnies

Rachel Black, February 5th 2020

To help alleviate any February blues, this week on the blog we are going to liven things up with some weather themed jokes! Read more>>

tags: #humor


#interview

Interview with Renee Sieber: What is Citizen Science

Rachel Black, November 25th 2020

Welcome to this week’s edition of the DRAW Blog where DRAW had the pleasure of interviewing Dr. Renee Sieber to discuss 4 questions about Citizen Science. Read more>>

tags: #interview #citizen science

Interview with a Scientist: Operational Meteorologist Dov Bensimon

Rachel Black, September 23rd 2020

In celebration of Science Literacy Week 2020 a special edition of the DRAW Blog interviewing Dov Bensimon, Operational Meteorologist in the Environmental Emergency Response Section at the Canadian Centre for Meteorological and Environmental Prediction (CCMEP) and Manager of the Montreal Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC). Read more>>

tags: #interview #science literacy week 2020


#introducing DRAW

Introducing DRAW Members: Jazmine Aldrich

Rachel Black, October 14th 2020

Interested in learning more about who is behind DRAW? Check out this post to learn more about Jazmine Aldrich! Read more>>

tags: #introducing DRAW

Introducing DRAW Members: Drew Bush

Rachel Black, July 22nd 2020

Interested in learning more about who is behind DRAW? Check out this post to learn more about Drew Bush! Read more>>

tags: #introducing DRAW

Introducing DRAW Members: Robert Smith

Rachel Black, February 19th 2020

Interested in learning more about who is behind DRAW? Check out this post to learn more about Robert Smith! Read more>>

tags: #introducing DRAW

Introducing DRAW Members: Gordon Burr

Rachel Black, November 20th 2019

Interested in learning more about who is behind DRAW? Check out this post to learn more about Gordon Burr! Read more>>

tags: #introducing DRAW

Introducing DRAW Members: Rachel Black

Rachel Black, September 25th 2019

Interested in learning more about who is behind DRAW? Check out this post to learn more about Rachel Black! Read more>>

tags: #introducing DRAW

Introducing DRAW Members: Renee Sieber

Rachel Black, July 31 2019

Interested in learning more about who is behind DRAW? Check out this post to learn more about Dr. Renee Sieber! Read more>>

tags: #introducing DRAW

Introducing DRAW Members: Victoria Slonosky

Rachel Black, April 24th 2019

Interested in learning more about who is behind DRAW? Check out this post to learn more about Dr. Victoria Slonosky! Read more>>

tags: #introducing DRAW


#meet the meteorologists

Meet the Meteorologists: France

Victoria Slonosky, April 14th 2021

Welcome back to Meet the Meteorologists, where we look at the individuals around the world who helped to contribute to the creation of meteorology as a field of study and who helped inform the practice here in Montreal. This week as part of Citizen Science Month, let’s take a look at those influential individuals from France. Read more>>

tags: #meet the meteorologists #citizen science month #climate in the age of empire

Meet the Meteorologists: Toronto

Victoria Slonosky, January 6th 2021

Welcome back to this instalment of Meet the Meteorologists where we look at the individuals around the world who helped to contribute to the creation of meteorology as a field of study and who helped inform the practice here in Montreal. This week let’s dive into the individuals from the Toronto observatories (Royal Artillery and Civilian). Read more>>

tags: #meet the meteorologists #climate in the age of empire

Meet the Meteorologists: Hudson's Bay Company

Victoria Slonosky, November 11th 2020

Welcome back to the next edition of Meet the Meteorologists, where we will be taking a look at those influential individuals from the Hudson’s Bay Company, which is the oldest incorporated joint-stock merchandising company in the English-speaking world. Read more>>

tags: #meet the meteorologists #climate in the age of empire

Meet the Meteorologists: Montreal

Victoria Slonosky, September 30th 2020

Welcome back to Meet the Meteorologists, where we look at the individuals around the world who helped to contribute to the creation of meteorology as a field of study and who helped inform the practice here in Montreal. This week, let’s look at those Montreal individuals! Read more>>

tags: #meet the meteorologists #climate in the age of empire

Meet the Meteorologists: Quebec City

Victoria Slonosky, August 5th 2020

Today we are kicking off a new series on the blog: Meet the Meteorologists. Our aim is to look at the individuals around the world who helped to contribute to the creation of meteorology as a field of study and who helped inform the practice here in Montreal. Let’s kick things off with New France and the people who called Quebec City home. Read more>>

tags: #meet the meteorologists #climate in the age of empire


#on this day

On This Day: Winter Carnival 1883

Rachel Black, January 22nd 2020

Did you know this Friday, January 24th, is the 137th anniversary of the first winter carnival held in Montreal? In honour of this anniversary, let’s take a look at what the weather in Montreal was like that day. Read more>>

tags: #history #on this day

On This Day

Rachel Black, December 18th 2019

Let’s look at the weather 100 years ago today: December 18th 2019. What sort of similarities might there be to present day? Read more>>

tags: #history #on this day


#rare weather phenomena

Rare Weather Phenomena - Part 2

Rachel Black, June 10th 2020

As promised, today’s blog post is a followup from last week, delving into rare weather phenomena connected to clouds and snow. Read more>>

tags: #rare weather phenomena

Rare Weather Phenomena - Part 1

Rachel Black, May 27th 2020

With this week’s forecast in Montreal looking intense (30C-33C, humidex 35C-38C, chance of thunder) we at DRAW thought it would be apt to delve into some rare weather phenomena. This will be a two part series, with this week looking at rare weather connected to storms. Read more>>

tags: #rare weather phenomena


#recommendations

Vicky Recommends

Rachel Black, January 20th 2021

Happy Wednesday everyone! This week we are delving into the bookshelves of Victoria Slonosky our Team Lead. Check out this post to see a list of fiction books Dr. Slonosky recommends which deal with weather topics. Read more>>

tags: #recommendations


#real life weather symbols

Weather Symbols in Real Life: Part 2

Rachel Black, December 4th 2019

Weather symbols are important to the transcribing of weather data as they explain without words weather phenomena that is being experienced.
This series will explore real life images of the weather symbols. Read more>>

tags: #real life weather symbols

Weather Symbols in Real Life

Rachel Black, June 5 2019

Weather symbols are important to the transcribing of weather data as they explain without words weather phenomena that is being experienced.
This series will explore real life images of the weather symbols. Read more>>

tags: #real life weather symbols


#science literacy week 2020

Interview with a Scientist: Operational Meteorologist Dov Bensimon

Rachel Black, September 23rd 2020

In celebration of Science Literacy Week 2020 a special edition of the DRAW Blog interviewing Dov Bensimon, Operational Meteorologist in the Environmental Emergency Response Section at the Canadian Centre for Meteorological and Environmental Prediction (CCMEP) and Manager of the Montreal Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC). Read more>>

tags: #interview #science literacy week 2020


#transcription tips

Transcription Tips: City Hall Sundays (page 2)

Jazmine Aldrich, April 28th 2021

We’re back with another edition of Transcription Tips! This blog post will tackle a tricky observation pattern that has stumped even the DRAW Team since late last year. Read more>>

tags: #citizen science month #transcription tips

Transcription Tips: Relative Humidity Average

Jazmine Aldrich, February 3rd 2021

Have you ever come across numbers in the relative humidity column that just don’t seem to fit? Perhaps they are much too high – into the hundreds – or they are listed below the last observation time? It is possible that you have run into the calculations for an average! Read more>>

tags: #transcription tips

Handwriting Help

Rachel Black, July 3rd 2019

Old handwriting can be difficult to read and interpret, even for the experienced. Are you having difficulty reading the pages you are transcribing? Look no further – this post is about tips and tricks to reading old handwriting. Read more>>

tags: #transcription tips


#weather and poetry

Weather and Poetry: Henry David Thoreau

Rachel Black, February 18th 2021

Welcome to the next instalment of Weather and Poetry, where we explore poets who touch on weather in their works. This week we are looking at American poet Henry David Thoreau. Read more>>

tags: #weather and poetry

Weather and Poetry: Ralph Waldo Emerson

Rachel Black, December 9th 2020

Welcome to the next instalment of Weather and Poetry, where we explore poets who touch on weather in their works. This week we are looking at American poet Ralph Waldo Emerson. Read more>>

tags: #weather and poetry

Weather and Poetry: E. Pauline Johnson

Rachel Black, September 2nd 2020

Welcome to DRAW’s latest series: Weather and Poetry! Here we will explore poets who touch on weather in their works. Let’s start with Canadian poet E. Pauline Johnson. Read more>>

tags: #weather and poetry


#weather history

Solar and Lunar Haloes or Coronas

Victoria Slonosky, June 23rd 2021

This week let’s take a look at weather symbols once more, and more specifically, at an issue that we were informed about by a dedicated transcriber! Read more>>

tags: #weather history

Weather in the History of Science

Victoria Slonosky, November 6th 2019

Learn more about the intersection between the history of science and weather observations/meteorology in this post by Dr. Victoria Slonosky. Read more>>

tags: #history #weather history

Communicating Weather: Storm Warnings and Telegraphs

Victoria Slonosky, May 8th 2019

A post looking at how weather, especially dangerous weather, was communicated in a time before telephones, cell phones and the internet. It is no surprise that weather observations played a significant part! Read more>>

tags: #weather history

International Communication: Weather Symbols

Victoria Slonosky, March 27th 2019

While transcribing you may have come across little symbols used to depict different types of weather, rather than writing.
Check out this post to learn more about the history of weather symbols and the difficulty we faced in designing our interface. Read more>>

tags: #weather history

Clouds, Cloud Types and Abbreviations

Victoria Slonosky, March 13 2019

Clouds or the lack of, are an ever present part of our skyscape. It is is no wonder then that when the classification of the world around us began during the 18th century Enlightenment, with Carl Linne in Sweden developing the binomial system of plant classification (still used today for all living things) that the classification of clouds wouldn’t be far behind. Read more>>

tags: #weather history

Blog Archive

Solar and Lunar Haloes or Coronas
Film Review: Twister (1996)>/a>
Convocations, traditions, and our medical professionals
A Mysterious Disappearance
Convocation: April 30th 1891
On This Day: McGill University Spring Convocation, April 30th 1894 A Day in the Life of a Donalda
Transcription Tips: City Hall Sundays (page 2)
Meet the Meteorologists: France
March: In Like a Lion, Out Like a Lamb
Irish Meteorologists
Montreal's Winter Sports
Weather and Poetry: Henry David Thoreau
Transcription Tips: Relative Humidity Average
Vicky Recommends
Meet the Meteorologists: Toronto
A Frosty Montreal Christmas
Weather and Poetry: Ralph Waldo Emerson
Interview with Renee Sieber: What is Citizen Science
Meet the Meteorologists: Hudson's Bay Company
Rainfall
Introducing DRAW Members: Jazmine Aldrich
Meet the Meteorologists: Montreal
Interview with a Scientist: Operational Meteorologist Dov Bensimon
Disinfecting with Ozone in Pandemics
Weather and Poetry: E. Pauline Johnson
Montreal as an Island
Meet the Meteorologists: Quebec City
Introducing DRAW Members: Drew Bush
Heatwaves: Blasts from the Past
Measuring Humidity: a Long and Difficult Process
Rare Weather Phenomena: Part 2
Rare Weather Phenomena: Part 1
Crafting the Weather
Don't Miss Our New Educator's Corner, Years in the Making..
Superb Super-Users: Thank You!
A Day in the Archives Calling all Weather Enthusiasts - We Challenge You!
Rainbow Wonderland
The Flood of 1886
Weather Forecasting: Vennor's Bulletin
Introducing DRAW Members: Robert Smith
DRAW February Funnies
On This Day: Winter Carnival 1883
DRAW and Student Projects: ENVR 401
On This Day
Weather Symbols in Real Life Part 2
Introducing DRAW Members: Gordon Burr
Observing During the War
Weather in the History of Science
BOOK REVIEW: Climate in the Age of Empire
DRAWn into Education
Introducing DRAW Members: Rachel Black
Sleighing
Introducing DRAW Members: Rebee Sieber
Horizontal and Vertical Montreal
Handwriting Help
Guest Post: Air Quality in Montreal
Weather Symbols in Real Life
Who Were the Observers?
Communicating Weather: Storm Warnings and Telegraphs
Introducing DRAW Members: Vicky Slonosky
Marginalia in the Ledgers
International Communication: Weather Symbols
Clouds, Cloud Types and Abbreviations